Sask. Search and Rescue organizations practice emergency scenario

News source from CTV News

Brendan Ellis, CTV Regina


Published Saturday, March 9, 2019 6:29PM CST


Last Updated Saturday, March 9, 2019 6:40PM CST

Search and Rescue Regina held a multi-jurisdictional search exercise near Pilot Butte on Saturday morning.

Volunteers from all 18 chapters of the provincial search and rescue organization came together to practice for real emergency situations in the future. Crystal Giesbrecht is a volunteer with Search and Rescue Regina and is grateful for the opportunity to prepare for the real thing.

“I am very new to search and rescue, so I’m just getting started. That’s why it’s a good learning opportunity to learn from more experienced searchers,” said Giesbrecht.

The volunteers were also joined by lots of other rescue groups including members of the Regina Police Service, RCMP and search dog organizations.

The search participants took part in a mock search to simulate a missing person’s case. The many different groups have to work together in the field during real events so it is important to practice working as a team.

“It is critical for the agencies to know each other well, to be prepared in advance, to know where the interconnections happen and how they happen and to make this whole operation seamless,” said Ralph Goodale, the federal Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

Although the event was just a simulation, the volunteers had to deal with clues, witnesses and distractions to make the situation as real as possible. Bobbi Buchanan from the Search and Rescue Saskatchewan Association of Volunteers, said that the simulation is an important exercise for all the organizations involved.

“To practice their skills in such a real scenario with all the agencies involved is extremely valuable to their continuing education and the proficiency out there in the field,” said Buchanan.

According to the volunteers, the simulation helps train everyone to stay calm, cool and collected in stressful situations.

“It’s definitely very urgent, but people stay calm. So you get that activation, you get your stuff and you get out there,” said Giesbrecht. “Once you’ve been through the motions, and you know the procedure and you know the steps, then when that happens in the real world when you get activated you’re going to be better prepared to handle that.”

Based on a report by Cole Davenport





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