The Best Shepherd's Pie You'll Ever Have with Anne Burrell | Best Thing I Ever Made



If Anne had to describe her favorite pie it would be a layer of luscious lamb stew topped with a layer of fluffy, creamy mashed potatoes.

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Get the recipe: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/anne-burrell/shepherds-pie-recipe-1923446

Shepherd’s Pie
RECIPE COURTESY OF ANNE BURRELL
Level: Easy
Total: 2 hr 35 min
Prep: 20 min
Cook: 2 hr 15 min
Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients

Extra-virgin olive oil, as needed
2 pounds boneless lamb shoulder or leg, cut into 1/2-inch dice
Kosher salt
1/2 cup flour
2 large leeks, white part only, cut into 1/2-inch dice
3 ribs celery, cut into 1/4-inch dice
3 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch dice
2 cloves garlic, smashed and finely chopped
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 cup red wine
3 to 4 cups chicken stock
2 bay leaves
1 bundle fresh thyme
2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, cut into 1-inch dice
3/4 to 1 cup heavy cream
2 to 3 tablespoons cold butter
1 cup frozen peas

Directions

Coat a wide pan with olive oil and bring to a medium-high heat.
Season the lamb with salt and toss with the flour. Add the lamb to the pan and brown well on all sides. Remove the lamb from the pan and reserve. Ditch the oil in the pan and add a splash new olive oil.
Add the leeks, celery, and carrots to the pan. Season the mixture with salt and cook, stirring frequently until the vegetables are soft and very aromatic, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook 2 to 3 minutes more. Add the lamb back to the pan and stir to combine.

Add the tomato paste and cook until the tomato paste starts to brown, about 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the wine and cook until it reduces by 1/2. Add enough stock to just cover the surface of the lamb. Taste and season with salt, if needed. Toss in the bay leaves and thyme bundle. Bring the stock to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Partially cover and simmer for 1 hour, or until the lamb is tender. When the stock level reduces replace with more to keep the meat submerged.

Place the potatoes in a medium saucepan and cover by 1-inch with tap water. Season the water with salt and bring the water to a boil. Boil the potatoes until they are fork tender, about 15 minutes. Drain the water from the potatoes and pass them while they are still hot through a food mill. In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the cream to a boil. Beat the cold butter and hot cream into the pureed potatoes. Taste and season with salt, if needed. The potatoes should be creamy and very flavorful.

Remove the lid from the lamb and add the peas. Simmer for 15 minutes more to allow the stock level to reduce. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if needed. When done, the lamb mixture should be thick and stew-like. Remove the bay leaves and thyme bundle and discard.

Preheat the broiler.
Transfer the lamb to a wide, flat flameproof baking dish. Spread the mashed potatoes over the lamb mixture in an even layer. Place the baking dish under the preheated broiler. Broil until the potatoes are golden brown and crispy.

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46 Replies to “The Best Shepherd's Pie You'll Ever Have with Anne Burrell | Best Thing I Ever Made”

  1. Thank you Miss Ann Burrell, for making this simplified for us. I always love watching your videos, and your mentality, and style of cooking, helps us non-chefs, just wanting to improve on our basic elementary level cooking.
    Ann, you would probably love teaching my daughter some tips, because she's way better than me, and she seems to figure out all this by herself, like it's instinct.
    We will try to incorporate your idea for Shepherder's Pie, but I might use a different meat, probably ground meat.
    But that's the beauty of shepherd's pie, it's fairly versitile, you can customize it.
    You'll always have my support, and cheering, as a beautiful woman, and excellent fun chef!! No one could stay down, or depressed, around you Ann, you are a natural light, and a smile for me.
    And I like it when you are joking, or being sarcasticly funny, I feed off of the entertainment. Lol.

  2. She is lovely and gracious. I met her at a Cubs game a couple years ago. She talked to and got selfies with everyone who came up to her. And yes, she is that bubbly in person. And even more gorgeous than on camera.

  3. Yes I have a friend who was the one that the guy was the best person in the United states in this 2nd year of them and a child died and he had to be in a relationship to 3rd and a year later and

  4. Im no expert when it comes to Shepherds pie. Im a nice Jewish boy from the Upper Eastside of Manhattan, who always thought that Shepherds pie sounded delicious, but was always entirely disappointed when I tasted it. That losing streak ended about a decade ago when I was at Fanellis the last great outpost of pre-gentrification Soho culture and the bartender told me that the shepherds pie was something special. Experience had taught me to trust whatever a bartender at Fanellis had to say, so I ordered it and could not have been more delighted!

    So, is this recipe truly the best? It looks under-browned to me, and I cant imagine the seasoning that I see here adding up to the robust flavor that I experience the dish every time I order it at Fanellis.

    But I didnt decide to comment because I had an opinion about the recipe. I decided to comment when I got about 3:34 into the video, when I saw what was clearly a piece of clip art of a Bavarian barmaid that had been re-colored in Irish colors. Im neither Bavarian nor Irish, so Ill let members of those ethnicities tear you apart for your cultural insensitivity. My complaint is that it took me less than five minutes of Googling to find the original image. Youre a huge corporation. Please try harder.

    https://www.iclipart.com/download.php?iid=382881&start=0&keys=fraulein&notkeys=&andor=AND&c1=COLOR&c2=BANDW&release1=&release2=&previewcheck=&cat=all&period=&collection=&group=&orien=&safe=1&tl=clipart&f1=y&f2=y&f3=y&f4=y&f5=y&f6=y&f7=y&f8=y&results=40&all=

  5. I am SO pleased that you know the difference between Shepherd's Pie and Cottage Pie. Most Americans don't know wtf they're doing with this recipe. Stick a bit of red wine in it- soooo good x

  6. Her and guy feiti…dont know last name..are literally the same person..except shes a real chef I think shes not as popular because shes a female

  7. LOL..I'm an accomplished (older…Ha) cook with a sophisticated palate. However, I think lamb (no matter how it's prepared), tastes like what I'd think a mouse or squirrel would taste like…
    eeeew… : )

    I grew up eating my Mom's version of "Shepherd's Pie" ( with beef), & how I loved this warm & comforting dish…(Anything with mashed potatoes is a BIG winner to me anyway)… : )

  8. For anybody who is trying out this recipe, let the meat mixture cool down completely before you add the mash; you'll get a better result

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